Official FBI Report of 10 Police Officers Arrested in Atlanta for protecting Drug Dealers

This is all coming on the heels of 7 police officers fired for being part of gang in the LA sheriff department called the Jump Out Boyz.. These guys celebrated shooting Black and Latinos.. In Berkeley, Ca a story is brewing about drugs dealers being given free passes if they go after activists in particular cop watchers. All this is on top of the report issued by Malcolm X Grassroots Movement that showed every 36 Hours an African-American is killed by police.. Now we have this…

riot-police_9-2-08ATLANTA—Seven Metro Atlanta Police officers, two former DeKalb County jail officers, a contract officer with Federal Protective Services, and five others have been charged with accepting thousands of dollars in cash payments to provide protection during drug deals in a federal undercover operation.

The defendants are making their initial appearances today before United States Magistrate Judge Alan J. Baverman. U.S. Attorney Sally Quillian Yates announced the case during a press conference today at the Richard Russell Federal Building, joined by FBI Special Agent in Charge Mark Giuliano and ATF Special Agent in Charge Scott Sweetow. Atlanta Police Department Chief George Turner, DeKalb Interim Police Chief Lisa Gassner, Forest Park Police Department Chief Dwayne Hobbs, MARTA Police Department Chief Wanda Dunham, DeKalb County Sheriff Thomas Brown, Stone Mountain Police Department Chief Chauncy Troutman, and Federal Protective Service District Commander Jim Longanecker also attended the press conference.

United States Attorney Yates said, “This is a troubling day for law enforcement in our city. The law enforcement officers charged today sold their badges by taking payoffs from drug dealers that they should have been arresting. They not only betrayed the citizens they were sworn to protect, they also betrayed the thousands of honest, hard-working law enforcement officers who risk their lives every day to keep us safe. We will continue to work with our local law enforcement partners to pursue this corruption wherever it lies.”

Mark F. Giuliano, Special Agent in Charge, FBI Atlanta Field Office, stated, “In recognizing the need for the criminal justice system and those who work within that system to firmly have the public’s trust, the FBI considers such public corruption investigations as being crucial. The FBI will continue to work with its various local, state, and other federal law enforcement agencies in ensuring that the public’s trust in its law enforcement officers is well deserved.”

“Corrupt public officials undermine the fabric of our nation’s security, our overall safety, the public trust, and confidence in those chosen to protect and serve,” said ATF Special Agent in Charge Scott Sweetow. “The corruption and abuse of power exemplified in this case can tarnish virtually every aspect of society.”

The law enforcement officers arrested today were: Atlanta Police Department (APD) Officer Kelvin Allen, 42, of Atlanta; DeKalb County Police Department (DCPD) Officers Dennis Duren, 32, of Atlanta and Dorian Williams, 25, of Stone Mountain, Georgia; Forest Park Police Department (FPPD) Sergeants Victor Middlebrook, 44, of Jonesboro, Georgia and Andrew Monroe, 57, of Riverdale, Georgia; MARTA Police Department (MARTA) Officer Marquez Holmes, 45, of Jonesboro, Georgia; Stone Mountain Police Department (SMPD) Officer Denoris Carter, 42, of Lithonia, Georgia; and contract Federal Protective Services Officer Sharon Peters, 43, of Lithonia, Georgia. Agents also arrested two former law enforcement officers: former DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office (DCSO) jail officers Monyette McLaurin, 37, of Atlanta, and Chase Valentine, 44, of Covington, Georgia.

Others arrested today were: Shannon Bass, 38, of Atlanta; Elizabeth Coss, 35, of Atlanta; Gregory Lee Harvey, 26, of Stone Mountain, Georgia; Alexander B. Hill, 22, of Ellenwood, Georgia; and Jerry B. Mannery, Jr., 38, of Tucker, Georgia.

According to United States Attorney Yates, the charges, and the criminal complaints:

The undercover operation arose out of an ATF investigation of an Atlanta area street gang in August 2011. ATF agents learned from an individual associated with the gang that police officers were involved in protecting the gang’s criminal operations, including drug trafficking crimes. According to this cooperating individual, the officers—while wearing uniforms, driving police vehicles, or otherwise displaying badges—provided security to the gang members during drug deals.

In affidavits filed in support of the charges, an FBI agent described how drug traffickers sometimes recruit law enforcement officers to maintain a physical presence at drug deals. The traffickers hope that the officers’ presence at the drug deals will prevent rival drug groups from intervening and stealing their drugs or money and also keeps legitimate law enforcement officers away from the scene. In return for the corrupt officers’ services, the drug dealers often pay the officers thousands of dollars, according to the affidavits.

Acting at the direction of FBI and ATF, the cooperator communicated to gang members and their associates that the cooperator sought police protection for upcoming drug deals. In response, three individuals—Bass, Coss, and Mannery—while not law enforcement officers themselves, provided the cooperator with the names of police officers who wanted to provide security for drug deals. Once these officers were identified, FBI and ATF agents arranged with the cooperator, as well as with Bass, Coss, and/or Mannery, for the officers to provide security for drug transactions that were described in advance to involve the sale of multiple kilograms of cocaine. The individuals charged today participated in undercover drug sales involving agents and/or cooperators, during which the agents and/or cooperators exchanged cash for kilograms of sham cocaine. The police officers, usually in uniform and displaying a weapon and occasionally in their police vehicles, patrolled the parking lots where the deals took place and monitored the transactions. These transactions were audio and video recorded.

The defendants arrested today include the seven police officers and one contract federal officer who protected the undercover drugs deals, as well as two former sheriff’s deputies who falsely portrayed themselves to be current deputies, and two individuals who falsely represented themselves as officers despite having no connection to a local police department. The defendants also include four individuals who are not law enforcement officers but who acted as intermediaries between the agents and/or cooperators and corrupt officers and also assisted with the scheme.

Specifically, the undercover investigation included the following transactions:

DeKalb County Police Department

Between October 2011 and November 2011, DeKalb County Police Officer Dennis Duren, working together with Bass, provided protection for what he and Bass believed were four separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Duren and Bass accepted cash payments totaling $8,800 for these services. During the transactions, Duren was dressed in his DeKalb County Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt, as he patrolled on foot in the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place. After the first two transactions, Duren allegedly offered to drive his patrol vehicle to future transactions for an additional $800 fee and afterward received an additional $800 in cash for using his patrol vehicle in the final transaction in November 2011. Duren and Bass are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine. Duren also is charged with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Between January and February 2013, DeKalb County Police Officer Dorian Williams, working together with Mannery and Bass, provided protection for what he and Mannery believed were three separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Williams and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $18,000 for these services. During the transactions, Williams was dressed in his DeKalb County Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt, and he patrolled the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place in his DeKalb Police vehicle. During a meeting between the three transactions, Williams allegedly instructed Bass to remove any cocaine from the scene if Williams had to shoot someone during the upcoming sale. In another meeting, Williams suggested that future drug transactions should take place in the parking lot of a local high school during the afternoon, so that the exchange of backpacks containing drugs and money would not look suspicious. Williams and Mannery are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine.

Stone Mountain Police Department

Between April and September 2012, Stone Mountain Police Officer Denoris Carter, working together with Mannery, provided protection for what he and Mannery believed were five separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. For these services, Carter and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $23,500. For all five transactions, Carter dressed in his Stone Mountain Police uniform. In four of the deals, he arrived in his police cruiser and either patrolled or parked in the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place and watched the transactions. During the final transaction in September 2012, Carter was on foot, displaying a firearm in a holster on his belt, and he walked through the parking lot in which the transaction took place and watched the participants. Finally, during one of the transactions, Carter agreed to escort the purchaser of the sham cocaine in his police vehicle for several miles, until the purchaser reached Highway 78. Carter is charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments, attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Atlanta Police Department

Between June and August 2012, Atlanta Police Officer Kelvin D. Allen, working together with Coss, provided protection for what he and Coss believed were three separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Allen and Coss accepted cash payments totaling $10,500 for their services. For two transactions, Allen dressed in his Atlanta Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt. Allen patrolled on foot in parking lots in which the undercover sales took place and appeared to be monitoring the transactions. During a meeting after the three transactions, a cooperator gave Allen and Coss each a $1,000 bonus payment in return for protecting the three transactions. Allen and Coss are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine. Allen also is charged with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

MARTA Police Department

Between August and November 2012, MARTA Police Department Officer Marquez Holmes, working together with Coss, provided protection for what he and Coss believed were four separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. For these services, Holmes and Coss accepted cash payments totaling $9,000. During the transactions, Holmes was dressed in his MARTA Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt. In two of the transactions, Holmes patrolled on foot in the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place and monitored the transactions. During the other two deals, Holmes drove to the site in his MARTA police cruiser and parked next to the vehicles in which the undercover drug sale took place. Holmes is charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments, attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Forest Park Police Department

Between October to December 2012, Forest Park Police Sergeants Victor Middlebrook and Andrew Monroe, sometimes working alone and at other times together, provided protection for what they believed were six separate drug deals in the Atlanta area, all involving multiple kilograms of cocaine. For his services in the first four transactions, Middlebook accepted cash payments totaling $13,800. During these transactions, Middlebrook wore plain clothes but displayed his badge and a firearm in a holster on his belt. He patrolled on foot in the parking lots nearby the vehicles in which the undercover sales took place and appeared to be monitoring the transactions. For the final two transactions, both Middlebrook and Monroe provided security and were given cash payments totaling $10,400. Middlebrook again monitored the transactions on foot in plain clothes while displaying his badge and gun, while Monroe watched from his vehicle in the parking lot and afterward escorted the purchaser of the sham cocaine for several miles. Middlebrook and Monroe are charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine; Middlebrook is also charged with possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office

In January 2013, former DeKalb County Sheriff Jail Officer Monyette McLaurin, working together with Harvey, provided protection for what they believed were two separate drug transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Harvey already had provided security for two undercover drug transactions in December 2012, falsely representing that he was a DeKalb County detention officer and wearing a black shirt with the letters “SHERIFF” printed across the back during the transactions. Harvey then stated that he knew other police officers who wanted to protect drug deals, and in January 2013, he introduced McLaurin as one of these officers. During a meeting to discuss future drug transactions, McLaurin falsely represented that he was a deputy employed by the DeKalb Sheriff’s office, even though his position as a jail officer ended in 2011. McLaurin and Harvey further stated during this meeting that they may need to kill another person who knew that Harvey had protected drug deals, if this person reported the activity to others.

During the two transactions in January 2013, McLaurin was dressed in a DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office uniform with a badge, and he carried a gun in a holster on his belt. He accompanied the undercover seller of the cocaine to pick up the drugs from a warehouse, counted the kilograms the seller received, and stood outside the purchaser’s vehicle during the actual transaction. He further discussed with the seller whether they should agree upon a signal for the seller to indicate that the sale had gone awry, requiring McLaurin to shoot the drug buyer. For their services, McLaurin and Harvey were paid $12,000 in cash. McLaurin and Harvey are each charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Later in January 2013, McLaurin and Harvey introduced a second former DeKalb County Sheriff’s Jail Officer, Chase Valentine, to help provide security for future drug deals. Like McLaurin, Valentine falsely represented himself to be a DeKalb County Sheriff’s Deputy, even though his position as a jail officer ended in 2010. Together with Harvey, Valentine provided security for one undercover drug transaction on January 17, 2013, during which he wore a DeKalb Sheriff’s Office uniform and a pistol in a holster on his belt. During the transaction, Valentine escorted the seller to pick up the sham cocaine, counted the number of kilograms delivered, and stood outside the purchaser’s car during the actual transaction. For these services, Valentine received $6,000 in cash. Valentine is charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Federal Protective Services

In November 2012, Sharon Peters, who was a contract officer for the Federal Protective Services, worked together with Mannery to provide protection for what they believed were two separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. For these services, Peters and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $14,000. For both transactions, Peters parked her vehicle nearby the cars where the sham drugs and money were exchanged and watched the transactions. Before both transactions, Peters told others that she had her pistol with her in the car. Peters is charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Imposter Clayton County Police Officer

Between December 2012 and January 2013, Alexander B. Hill falsely represented himself to be an officer with the Clayton County Police Department while providing security for what he believed were three separate drug transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. During an initial meeting, Hill wore a uniform that appeared to be from Clayton Police, but during the transactions, he wore plain clothes and, for at least the first deal, a badge displayed on his belt. For these services, Hill received payments totaling $9,000 in cash. Hill charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and with possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Each charge of attempted possession with intent to distribute at least five kilograms of cocaine carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment, a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison, and a fine up to $10,000,000. Each charge of attempted possession with intent to distribute at least 500 grams of cocaine carries a maximum penalty of 40 years in prison, a mandatory minimum sentence of five years in prison, and fine of up to $5,000,000. Each charge of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment, a mandatory minimum sentence of five years in prison, and a fine of up to $250,000. Each charge of conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and fine of up to $250,000. In determining the actual sentence, the court will consider the United States Sentencing Guidelines, which are not binding but provide appropriate sentencing ranges for most offenders.

The public is reminded that criminal charges are only allegations. A defendant is presumed innocent of the charges and it will be the government’s burden to prove a defendant’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt at trial.

These cases are being investigated by special agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

Assistant United States Attorneys Kim Dammers, Jill Steinberg, and Brent Alan Gray are prosecuting these cases.

For further information please contact the U.S. Attorney’s Public Information Office at USAGAN.Pressemails@usdoj.gov or (404) 581-6016. The Internet address for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia is www.justice.gov/usao/gan.

Comments

  1. Sovereign One says:

    We are in the age of Truth and Justice. Truth demands Justice!

  2. Reblogged this on Dogma and Geopolitics.

  3. Book’em Dano (RED)

  4. Is that about that long wolf that comes to play he’s talking about…”Obama’s Real Reason He Wants Your Guns http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/obamas-real-reason-he-wants-your-guns/ via @DocsOnline”

  5. Reblogged this on indigomarley.

  6. Amanda Matthews says:

    Oh damn. Nothing that should surprise anyone I guess. Like I said in another thread, my Mom had a friend who was a homicide detective until he couldn’t take it any more and went back to being a patrol cop (that was better?). He told me that half of the cops on the street would be in jail themselves if they hadn’t gotten hired on by the police force. I have always known that to be true.

    I’m bookmarking this and passing it on and using it against every ‘cops can do no wrong’ whacked post I see.

    I’ve NEVER seen anything about this anywhere else but here. I will look around and see what I can find but I first have to admit that this place is a gold mine of intelligence and information. Thank you.

  7. Good investigative work, Davey….I come here daily and repost everything!
    Thanks!

  8. all money ain’t good money.. they just sacrificed their freedom for something that wasn’t even worth it. -purple

    • Amanda Matthews says:

      Really. They’ve disgraced themselves and humiliated their families, thrown away their lives, and will spend decades in prison. All for money. There isn’t enough money in the world to make all that grief and misery worth it.

  9. Crazy -RUST

  10. This is crazy!!! GREY

  11. Wow – blue

  12. A golden week end Asea starter yoo hoo Mammon Davey D…Public Eminence Nooo One….Base,…by the length of this article debate on ‘agent Flintstones’ or bii boii_ness essay_Ism for good Journaile _Ism the ‘Iron Curtain’- by that child molesters the Queens British past,..another clinque will strive for social labor…when the vaginal mono_logues vogues warm…Salaam! DIY against ‘Age_Ism’…Quood Hafiz!

  13. totally wow with a capital “W” (RED)

  14. LISA SMITH says:

    WE HAVE KNOWN OF SUCH ACTIVITIES IN N.Y. YEARS AGO BUT, NO ONE LISTENED TO US THE COPS ARE CORRUPTED IN THE 5 BOROUGHS BUT EVERY THINK THEY ARE NOT SO THIS DO NOT SURPRISE ME

  15. No surprised.

  16. Otto von Bismarck said: “War is the health of the state” and recent history reveals that war is not always soldiers on a battlefield.

    The criminals in any illegitimate government thrive on conflict and that’s why I don’t support the Tenth Amendment movement or any “movement” which requires organizing or use of the tools of the State. Boycotts, protests, refusal to comply – this is dangerous stuff and those who engage the power structure this way are likely to be made examples of. The State doesn’t tolerate challenges; even writing like this is becoming dangerous.

    Such circumstances dictate a new approach. We will not solve the problems of this society rooted in collectivism with collective action. Solutions must come from the individual – an opposite consciousness from that which created the problem.

    In order to use the opposite consciousness from what started the problem we must think differently. Rather than resist in the predictable manner, we must use the same psychological methods used against us and redirect them towards the tools of the state and the criminal elite – their gunslingers and enforcers. After all, they’re human too.

    If WE allow Civil War II to kick off, it will be these men and women who’ll deliver the first blows, and consequently they who will suffer the greatest casualties while the elite hide in their shelters, safe from all the chaos you and I will have to endure.

    Everything we see in the controlled media concerning the police keeps telling us they’re the good guys. Its mass mind control designed to keep you enthralled with the cops. They’re raised to hero status. Witness how police funerals are handled and how the media never discusses their failures in terms other than one of the individual. A frail human who succumbed to temptation and disappointed us all. We’re allowed to discuss the bad apples, but never to question the system itself. So opposite conciseness: WE run a psy-op. Not a mass message, diffuse and easily ignored but close to home and personal.

    Mass media is tightly controlled and doesn’t allow for messages outside of the control structure. Ours is true opposite consciousness because its individually tailored. We don’t need TV commercials or even billboards, because its universal: what goes for the county sheriff in Daytona Beach applies equally to the state policeman in Alaska. Bypassing the mechanisms of mass media, and making it a personal message.

    History proves that when loyal oath keepers know the facts, as most are genuinely good people; they stop enforcing the tyranny. The truth is a powerful weapon, our psy-ops don’t have to rely on lies and distortions. All we need do is point out to the police the reality of their existence. Reveal to them what was heretofore undisclosed and what history has taught which they have not been permitted to know.

    Never forget this: when someone controls your understanding of history – they can control your perceptions of reality in the present. Think about that long and hard. Its an undeniable truth of life.

    People employed in law enforcement will not sleep well at night if they expect the American people to resist attempts to disarm them, or imprison citizens who have committed no crime against natural law. Knowing we out number and out gun them by several orders of magnitude, and when we take into account their preexisting mistrust of the public, this is the curse of knowledge.

    If you know any cops personally, or know someone who does, then they should be made to understand this -

    As members of our communities, we generally know where they live.
    They MUST answer calls and can never really know what awaits them.

    The recent hyper media coverage of an ambush on firefighters and a police officer at the scene of a blaze in Webster, N.Y., was no accident. It was yet another message to public servants: the citizens are to be feared. Cops are already trained to view each person they meet as a potential threat. It weighs heavily on their minds when they arrive at a scene as to what they might encounter.

    We need to reinforce those facts to them. We must direct our neighborhood cop to these historical facts.

    In 2010 the Egyptian National Police was widely feared as brutal and corrupt. Within days of establishing numerical superiority on the streets, repressed hostility in the average citizen led to many police officers being beaten to death. Some were dragged from their houses and murdered in front of their families. The fear of the average cop in Egypt was such that many discarded their uniforms and fled for their lives.

    Egypt was forced to formally acknowledge this loss of moral authority by disbanding the National Police.

    This partially explains the swift and violent crackdowns in American cities, lest the protestors begin to overwhelm the cops. After all, even at their greatest concentration they’re really only a tiny fraction of the populace.

    There have been two recent incidents where the police were actually defeated – in California and NYC. But if you only paid attention to the corporate controlled media you wouldn’t have heard of them. Both cases saw protestors with improvised body armor from sporting equipment, gas masks and, home made shields from trash cans. They fought back, and were victorious.

    Using oven mitts to toss back tear gas grenades, dry chemical fire extinguishers to repel counter attacks, while maneuvering behind massive steel garbage dumpsters on wheels – in both cases these ‘protestors’ were allowed to leave the field of battle by the police who would have otherwise been forced to use firearms.

    I have no illusions… the police out gunned them. Wisely, they accepted a tactical loss because they understood the larger issue that if enough sheeple realize the police CAN be defeated, the whole scam is up.

    Opening fire on the demonstrators would have negated their ability to hide this defeat and been a public relations nightmare. Their lap dogs in the corporate mind control media acted as the accomplice and imposed black outs on this news and unless you were there, few knew. When video of these incidents makes it to YouTube, its often pulled within days.

    I strongly suspect this is a large part of why the “occupy” movement was both co-opted and essentially shut down as it was largely beyond its usefulness to the power structure as a controlled opposition.

    But more -
    In July and August of 1944 the retreating German Wehrmacht left behind a power vacuum in France. Well supplied with small arms by the Allies, the Maquis extracted a terrible vengeance upon the local Gendarme.

    Many of these beat cops were simply “following orders” but few resistance fighters believed in that. If you willingly enforce unjust laws, it will generate violent resistance. Society holds this in check as long as people believe there will be a price extracted, but once the police state slips?

    For weeks until advancing British and US forces could put a stop to it, there were French cops swinging from lamp posts, found dead in ditches and worse; sometimes entire families were killed. Criticism of French police forces today as being lax on demonstrators, forgets their institutional memory of the summer of 1944.

    Remember, fear is a weapon. Use it. And be sure to understand (this means YOU, the government operative monitoring this) that I am not advocating the use of violence. Everything I stand for is about preventing that. What I am pointing out is that in a nation of 315 million, someone, somewhere, is always out of control. And when the police start acting against the people, some of these irrational people will react violently.

    If the police already fear the unknown from a traffic stop, domestic violence call, or report of a disturbance, then help them understand that if they ever try and enforce open tyranny on Americans via gun confiscation, food denial, detention of children, mass arrests, collective punishment or detention of citizens who have not broken a REAL law?

    They will face the wrath of an angry and well armed populace which outnumbers and outguns them. And all the fantastic military hardware the federal government provided will not be enough to save them. Sooner or later they will have to go home…

    The curse of knowledge will gnaw at them each time the radio crackles with their call sign.

    By now you should understand that THIS is the real meaning of the Second Amendment, the one you’re not supposed to know. Only by ensuring the police truly understand that, and by our insistence that they respect their oath will we be able to avoid the Civil War that the criminals in government are deliberately engineering. A war waged to consolidate their power and prevent being held accountable for their crimes when the mathematically unavoidable end of the paper dollar arrives soon enough.

    Everyone knows a cop or knows someone who does. Its incumbent upon YOU to be the change you want to see if we’re to avoid the bloodshed that the globalists are trying to provoke. THIS is individual action, non violent and in the opposite consciousness.

    by anon

  17. Wow

  18. $250,000.00 CASH REWARD for Any Information Leading To The ARREST!!! and Conviction!!! of Public Corrupted Sheriff Mike Scott for Organized Public Corruption Fortune Tellers Fraud Cover Up with (Fact) Con Artist Criminal Miriam Pacheco aka “La Madrina Miriam” and Co-conspirators Using the same Modus Operandi as Convicted Detective Jack M. Makler who was sentenced to FIVE YEARS in Federal Prison.

    We are looking for anyone who has any information leading to the ARREST and CONVICTION of Public Corrupted Sheriff Mike Scott engaging in Drug Tracfickaing, Murder, Conspircay To Murder, Public Corruption Conspiracies Cover Ups, Public Corrupted Sheriff Mike Scott violating RICO Laws In The State of Florida for Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Statue Act, Title 18 United States Code Sections 1961-1968.

    FOR MORE DETAILED SPECIFIC INFORMATION ABOUT THE SHERIFF MIKE SCOTT $250,000.00 (Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars) CASH REWARD LEADING TO THE ARREST and CONVIVTION of Public Corrupted Crooked SHERIFF MIKE SCOTT Visit http://www.enzovincenzi.com and http://www.leecountyconspiracy.net
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  1. [...] This is all coming on the heels of 7 police officers fired for being part of gang in the LA sheriff department called the Jump Out Boyz.. These guys celebrated shooting Black and Latinos.. In Berkeley, Ca a story is … Continue reading → [...]

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