Remember When Malcolm X was an Emcee? We Pay Tribute to Our Black Shining Prince

Remember the days when Malcolm X ( El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz) was an emcee on everyone’s Hip Hop records? Folks back in the days would always sample him and have his words of wisdom be apart of the soundtrack..I recall the early days of Hip Hop when deejays like Afrika Bambaataa would rock Malcolm speeches over break beats. Not only did it sound funky but it helped raise our consciousness..

During the so-called Golden era You had everyone from Poor Righteous Teachers to Paris to 3x Dope to Gang Starr to Public Enemy all rocking Malcolm samples..I recall when KRS One mimicked the infamous Malcolm X pose where he was holding a gun looking out the window, ready to protect himself after his home had been firebombed. Many say KRS kicked things off when he featured Malcolm X in his My Philosophy video … I miss those days..

Remember when Malcolm was sampled so much that he wound up being on the cover of the Source Magazine? Say what you will, the powers that be worked overtime to remove Malcolm from our collective consciousness..It’ll be interesting to note how many newscast make mention of his birthday today… or how many urban radio stations that’ll quickly disperse info on Kanye and Kim dating but will be silent and omit Malcolm’s birthday or any activities related to it, in their daily banter..

I say on this birthday lets do more than give a shout out.. Let’s return Malcolm back the forefront of Hip Hop consciousness…

If you happen to be in Oakland today.. head on over to San Antonio Park for the annual Malcolm X Festival

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7o3zVD7rx0&sns=tw

Many have got it twisted in thinking Malcom X somehow softened or lightened up in his final days.. This speech given in 1965 one month before he was killed is anything but soft.. He stays sharply focused and unwavering in his fight for freedom

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac3WliIKNPI

Here’s a couple of Malcolm Music mixes you might enjoy

J-Dilla Meets Malcolm X (Davey D remix)

North Carolina rapper K-Hill

Drummer Keith LeBlanc‘s classic and one of the earliest records paying tribute to Malcolm X

Malcolm X Meets Gang Starr -(Ballot or the Bullet)

Malcolm X Meets Public Enemy (the Govt Has Failed Us)

Intv w/ Immortal Technique during Malcolm X

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Malcolm X: His Life and Legacy (Documentary)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gD4Kex-uHWM&feature=related

Comments

  1. Well said…AMEN!!!

  2. Reblogged this on saylovemusic and commented:
    Remember When Malcolm X was an Emcee?

  3. Reblogged! ♥

  4. Malcom says in a revolution you’re too busy swinging to be singing… the capitalist system plays the bait and switch on us…it SELLS us the music and keeps the revolution in its pocket…

  5. Reblogged this on Moorbey's Blog.

  6. Reblogged this on Don Lucuis' Chronicle and commented:
    Malcolm X was, in my opinion, the face of the civil rights movement.

  7. Malcom X was a spokesman for a black prison cult called the Nation of Islam. The group teaches that a white convicted drug dealer named Fard is God. Malcolm was eventually murdered. One of the men convicted was a Nation of Islam member that insists he was set up by other members of the organization. The lesson is to stay away from cults. Malcom made significant contributions to disrupting & confusing the racist tribal beliefs of white people and encouraging a do for self mentality among blacks, and his intentions I believe were positive. However, the underbelly of confused and socially maladapted beliefs that he embraced cannot be marginalized as insignificant. They are/were really fucked up.

  8. Get On down Brother Davey D. I miss Public Enemy, The Last Poets, Gill Scott Heron and I did catch Amy Goodman On one of the breaks to Democracy Now, She proudly said Syl Johnson, “Is It Because I’m Black”…Right in front of the camera…fuckin’ made my day.

  9. Happy birthday, sad deathday.
    I will also add schoolly d to the list as they dedicated a track to his voice over a beat.

  10. Music

  11. juan guillermo varela barragan says:

    well as a new yorker let me tell you hip hip is grearttness all times …as i grew up in brooklyn and went to erasmus hall higth school …all i can say the year was 1984 and as a colombiam imigrant and who love american music period i start to listen to hip hop then wit my new culture of music i star to like afrika banbata .kurtis blow.and as hip hop was develoment is a graet time to say hip hop start in the bronx and all those good time hip hop was going all those great of hip hop started singing thing about things that people was not in to like racism and black and whithe all that …it hurtme couse here im a colombiam born and with a new culture at hand to tell u the truth….it was like went i read malkom x book i realice how important he was in this great music culture how ever you want it or cll it ….m,alcom is the inspire of many …so lets not forget history couse we dont know the future ok …..

    well thank you malcom you did it for me great ness is power. power is inteligent .inteligent is envy .envy is hate hate is death…all we want is peace .love .understanding.and that malcom and all those people who made a change in your life …to me malcom did it

    long live malcom x

  12. i think this guy is awesome and what u guys have done with it pretty sick with ur beats and he is a very good man

  13. Jaya Sacinatha das says:

    Malcolm X evolved from someone who spoke out of hate to someone who’s vision was broadened to accept others as he accepted himself. The problem is that he already created enemies in the Black Muslim movement and they eventually killed him. He was not mature in his spiritual growth or advancement like MLK was. I don’t think whites killed MX because they knew he had enemies among the Black Muslims who wanted him dead and it was just a matter of time. MLK was and is the greatest black leader because his message was a pure spiritual message of tolerance and non-violence which is based on the examples of Christ and Gandhi.

  14. tight write up

  15. Don’t really know where Jaya Sacinatha das, received information from. Malcolm is forever a man of Peace, Possibility, and Vision. As his father did in his lifetime and his grandson in his lifetime. Always a bright shinning prince in the minds of forward thinking peoples of the world. Peace and Blessings to them. Allah’s grace be with them.

Trackbacks

  1. […] D on Malcolm X 19 May 2012 | No comments To celebrate Mr. X’s birthday, Mr. D had some choice words. During the so-called Golden era You had everyone from Poor Righteous Teachers to Paris to 3x Dope […]

  2. […] Remember When Malcolm X was an Emcee? We Pay Tribute to Our Black Shining Prince(hiphopandpolitics.wordpress.com) […]

  3. […] Remember When Malcolm X was an Emcee? We Pay Tribute to Our Black Shining Prince (hiphopandpolitics.wordpress.com) […]

  4. Malcolm X « says:

    […] X quote and link to interesting blog with great resources and […]

  5. […] Remember When Malcolm X was an Emcee? We Pay Tribute to Our Black Shining Prince « Davey D’s …. Share this:RedditTwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestEmailPrintTumblrStumbleUponDiggLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. […]

  6. […] Davey D’s Hip Hop Corner (Blog) : “Remeber When Malcolm X was an Emcee?” […]

  7. […] c’est la catastrophe enfin disons que j’aime beaucoup les catastrophes j’ai mis le t-shirt Malcolm X, il a un fusil mitrailleur et il regarde par la fenêtre en écartant les rideaux il n’y a […]

  8. […] of the Last Poets. Likewise, how many rap fans are aware of a time when the memory of Malcolm X was inseparable from Hip Hop? Would it be a gross generalisation to assume that very few fans of Nicki Minaj have any idea who […]

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